Massage therapy post TBI

As a massage therapist, I’m fairly biased on this subject. I believe my colleagues and I can do a lot of work to contribute to pain reduction and calming down the nervous system. I’ve seen a lot of great benefits from registered massage therapy in the post concussion/ post TBI group but of course this remains an individual journey.

Treatment type: Registered Massage Therapy

How to find: http://www.cmto.com/

Price: In Ontario often $85.00-100.00 an hour

Credentials: Look for someone registered with the massage therapy college in your province, I’ve linked to Ontario’s college above

What is it? From the CMTO

“Massage therapy consists primarily of hands-on manipulation of the soft tissues of the body, specifically, the muscles, connective tissue, tendons, ligaments and joints for the purpose of optimizing health.”

Notes from our treatment:

Due to the visual issues Jason experienced (non diagnosed until 1 year into recovery) his gait changed drastically, from a strong confident man to a gait similar to that of a stroke survivor. One side shuffled more than walked and he had acute low back pain repeatedly in that first year.

Massage therapy with some of my colleagues in our hometown alleviated a lot of to his pain and helped even out tone between the two sides. Registered massage therapists are educated in anatomy and physiology and were able to assess his range of motion and tone throughout his upper body. While some areas were uncomfortable to be worked Jason always felt relief post treatment. Often the chance to lie down mid day and have a massage also lead to a deeper sleep in the evening.

As a massage therapist I find with most of the clients I work on slow, gentle manipulation goes much further than the adage “no pain, no gain”. It’s not necessary to be in pain throughout your whole treatment or feel like you’ve been hit by a truck post treatment. Registered Massage Therapists in Ontario are educated use range of motion exercises and stretching as part of their treatments which can help significantly if you are experiencing any symptoms of decreased mobility or coordination on one side. All treatments should be explained to you before you get on the table and your massage therapist should be checking in with you about pressure and if you understand and want the treatments they are proposing.

Finally, I’d like to remind everyone reading that in most treatment facilities some of the environment can be altered – I often turn off lights or music to help those with sensory issues post TBI. Your therapist may not know to suggest these accommodations so please ask for anything you need to maximize your benefits from the massage. Also don’t assume because you have a head injury your treatment must be localized to head and neck, as in Jason’s case often symptoms show up throughout the body and a global approach to treatment can be beneficial. Communication with your massage therapist is key and will help you decide if this is an intervention to include in your rehab program.