Criminal Injuries Compensation Board: The hearing

We submitted our application to the CICB around May 2015 and were granted a hearing in early December 2015. Jason spoke to his case manager intermittently throughout that time and he always seemed nice, but we were still afraid of the hearing.

We told few people about it, I had already heard from some people in TBI support groups that we shouldn’t be flaunting how lucky we were to be able to apply to CICB (it’s a funny sort of luck when you hang out in TBI world). Our parents knew and one set of friends, who we planned on celebrating with that evening regardless of the outcome.

We had the choice of meeting in Barrie or Toronto but because the detective on Jason’s case was based in Toronto we opted for that location. It meant an early morning train ride to the city and some added anxiety being back in the city where Jason was assaulted but our detective had treated us so kindly over the last year and a half we were happy to make life easy for him. We arrived at the CICB building ridiculously early , with tea and coffee in hand, which allowed us to get ourselves even more worked up and nervous.

Part of the stress lay with the fact that in general Jason and the detective were the only ones allowed to speak in the hearing. I feared things missing from our story because of Jason’s memory or pride. As soon as we entered the room the committee, two lovely people, chose to swear me in as well so that I could help with the parts he forgot. Already a prayer answered because they chose to be compassionate.

Because Jason has no memory of that night the detective spoke first, sharing his information and affirming that Jason was not the cause of the incident.  I am certain this would have been a wasted day if the detective hadn’t shown up and stood up for us. I can never explain to him how grateful we are. Following his statements, Jason and I took turns answering questions about the effect this has had on our life and why certain treatment decisions were made. I think in all we were in the room for less than the longest 40 minutes of my life. Despite what I read in various news articles we were always spoken to respectfully, we were given time to come up with articulate answers and clarify ourselves if emotion got in the way of our words.  Both members were kind when they questioned us. It was the loveliest possible conversation for the situation we were in.

After all the discussions were done we were asked to leave the room while the committee came to a decision. A funny quirk of the system, that I don’t think either Jason or I realized until we were in it, was that they still had to determine if Jason WAS a victim. Because the men that did this have not been caught and no charges have been laid, the first step was deciding if a crime had been committed against him. So we were happy, in the weirdest sort of way, to learn that they agreed he had been a victim of a crime and then they walked us through all their justifications for awarding certain amounts of money and not awarding other things. We did end up receiving some money to help pay medical bills but we had already decided that we would write a blog post about the compassionate side of CICB before we knew that. We were blown away by the kindness we were shown.

We write this post not to flaunt our “luck” but to offer a different perspective on the CICB. So much of what is out there vilifies the people on the committee and we want our story to offer some hope to those going through the process, there are some really extraordinary individuals involved with this committee and it can be a peaceful experience.