Traumatic Brain Injury and Occupational Therapy

In March 2015 we were lucky enough to meet a private occupational therapist from our hometown that has significant history working with traumatic brain injuries and Jason worked with her for about a month. Then he was admitted to Toronto Rehab and was able to work with another occupational therapist there. They are both stunningly intelligent women with so much compassion for the people they work with. We count ourselves  very lucky to have met each of them. Here is our summary of Jason’s experiences with occupational therapy post TBI:

Treatment type: Occupational Therapy

How to find: http://www.caot.ca/index.asp : http://www.coto.org/default.asp

Price: in a hospital setting covered by OHIP, private often $120-160.00 an hour

Credentials: Look for someone that is registered with the College of Occupational Therapists

What is it? From the College of Occupational Therapists of Ontario “Occupational therapists (OTs) are health care professionals who help people learn or re-learn to manage the every day activities that are important to them, including caring for themselves or others, caring for their home, participating in paid and unpaid work and leisure activities. The people occupational therapists work with may be having difficulties because of an accident, disability, disease, emotional or developmental problem or change related to the normal aging process.”

Notes from our assessment:

In the private setting Tracy Milner assessed Jason using the BrainFX 360 tool which was the first real assessment Jason had in his recovery. She spent time explaining her results to us and our families and started working with Jason on sleep hygiene, a lot of the ideas we discussed last month came from her advice and materials she suggested. She worked with both of us on how to set up our home and schedule to make communication easier and later this year I’ll be writing about some of the designs we’ve used to create a command center in our house.

She put together a modified work program for Jason’s employer and met with them to explain what Jason’s limitations were and how they were affecting his work as well as she offered solutions that were workable for his management team. This alone was worth millions because recruiting Jason’s manager to be on our team and fighting for Jaosn was so important and there is a glaring lack of information out there for employers of those with traumatic brain injuries.

Tracy had plans to start working on cognitive skills such as planning Jason’s work days and project management but at that time he was admitted to Toronto Rehab and it was a program we couldn’t refuse.

In the hospital setting I think Jason was at an advantage because he already had an understanding of his limitations and lifestyle changes thanks to his time with Tracy. His OT at the rehab program was able to jump right in to tasks tailored to his goal of returning to work full time. Where we were only able to afford to meet with Tracy every 1-2 weeks rehab was offering OT sessions two times a week. The activities included things like: a treasure hunt of sending emails, making phone calls, checking in at locations around the hospital that let me work on goal setting and prioritization, building a motor and discussing energy conservation.

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