No sleepy, no talky

I’ve posted some professional opinions on why sleep is so important post TBI and lots of ideas for how to make sleep work for you. Today I wanted to write a bit about how a lack of sleep presents itself in our life. Jason often tells people that fatigue is the first domino in his symptoms. Once fatigue starts to set in all his other symptoms tumble out, a year into this life I’m starting to be able to pick out the order of symptoms he commonly has and the warning signs to put an end to our activities.

If Jason runs himself to exhaust his A batteries in a day we can usually notice some symptoms. The first thing to go is usually his words. He’ll start interchanging words, missing words completely (in his case often nouns), or just drift off in the middle of sentences. In general he doesn’t notice these things which makes communication frustrating at times. More than once I’ve begged for nouns to be thrown into the conversation because I’m completely lost. At this stage there are also usually some concentration limitations, instead of verbal cues for things that need to be done we absolutely need to write down Jason’s list.

When Jason gets to his B batteries and uses them up concentration goes out the window. Jason might start out trying to get a glass of milk and end up cutting the lawn. Based on Clark Elliott’s book we make the comparison that Jason’s brain is like a computer and when he gets to this stage of fatigue it’s like new computer programs are opening up and he can’t close the window/program until he’s completed the task. So while he may want a glass of milk, if he looks out the window and sees the lawn needs to be cut that thought may take over and between fatigue and the learned fear of forgetting to do something he wants, cutting the lawn becomes priority #1. Weirdly, around the transition from B to C batteries Jason loses some ability to initiate tasks. It’s a thin line between being so tired that he switches tasks too easily and so tired that he can’t switch to a new task. This often happened at the end of the work day, knowing that he had to get to his car, drive home and be awake until dinner, he would often become stuck at his desk. I can not explain how these two things can both be signs of fatigue but they are and it seems like when Jason speaks to others with concussions or traumatic brain injuries they know EXACTLY what he means.

Once C batteries are being used and depleted it’s a bad situation. In another weird dichotomy Jason usually flips from anger (which was never an issue in his life pre TBI) to anxiety pretty quickly. The anger was really prevalent during the first 5 months when we weren’t receiving any care and he was working 50-60 hours a week in a management position. I’m sure there were a lot of other factors contributing to the anger such as denial of symptoms and confusion due to the lack of information we had. The anger now usually comes out at our cupboard that has cookie trays (does anyone know how to store those without them falling out if you need one?). Anxiety is more common at this point in our life and we do everything we can to help Jason find a way to rest before a panic attack becomes inevitable.

While these are purely our experiences we’ve heard from many others with traumatic brain injuries that can track their progression of symptoms and fatigue in a similar fashion. Almost 100% of the time everyone agrees that symptoms get worse with fatigue and that tracking early symptoms and planning a rest period can prevent full break downs.

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